Traditional Chinese Cultural Academy

Acknowledging the Contributions of Lineage Descendants of Yang Lu Chan Old Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan

Home
About Us
    * Certification Criteria
    * Why Certification?
    * Articles
Professor Huo Chi-Kwang
    * Certified Students
Kuo Lien-Ying
    * Certified Students
Chen Pan-Ling
    * Certified Students
TCCA Certifications
Tai Chi Links
Contact Us
In Memory of
The Distinguished and Notable
Grandmaster Kuo Lien Ying
 
 
 Original source of photograph is unknown
 
Kuo Lien Ying was born in Inner Mongolia, China in 1895. His father was a silk merchant, and his family was wealthy. Master Kuo Lien Ying is credited with bringing the rare and powerful Guang Ping Yang tai chi chuan to the United States.

In 1907, at the age of twelve, Kuo Lien Ying began training in Northern Style Shaolin kung fu. He studied for five years with Master Li Lin, who was especially skilled in Chang chuan ( Shaolin long fist). Master Kuo became very proficient and skillful at this powerful and rigorous martial arts system.

In 1918 Kuo Lien Ying became one of only four disciples of Wang Jiao Yu.

Kuo Lien Ying, at the age of 28, studied xingyiquan for two years with Master Huang Gin Yin. Master Kuo also studied baguazhang with Chang Hsin Zhai and Chung Ting Hua.

Kuo Lien Ying is thought to have become a governor of a province in China, and in 1944 he became a general in the army of Chiang Kai Shek. In 1947, after the Communist takeover, he fled to Taiwan, became a congressman and opened up a martial arts school.

In 1965, Master Kuo immigrated to the United States and settled in San Francisco’s Chinatown where he opened a martial arts school named Lien Ying Tai Chi Chuan Martial Arts Academy and continued teaching the Guang Ping Yang tai chi chuan style.

Master Kuo Lien Ying was the author of two books on the subject of tai chi chuan, “The T'ai Chi Boxing Chronicle”and “Tai-Chi Chuan in Theory and Practice”.

In 1984 Master Kuo Lien Ying died at the age of 96 in Mongolia, China.

Source:  TCCA archives